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IB Film - Case Studies

Gone with the Wind 
Director: Victor Fleming 

Release Date: 17 January 1941 (USA) 

Genre: Drama, Romance, War 

Awards: Won 8 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 5 nominations 

Synopsis: American classic in which a manipulative woman and a roguish man carry on a turbulent love affair in the American south during the Civil War and Reconstruction.

 

It is often considered to be the most beloved, enduring and popular film of all time. The famous film, shot in three-strip Technicolor, is cinema's greatest, star-studded, historical epic film of the Old South during wartime that boasts an immortal cast in a timeless, classic tale of a love-hate romance. Some have criticized the film for romanticizing, sanitizing, or even promoting the values of the South, in particular its reliance on slavery. Authenticity is enhanced by the costuming, sets, and variations on Stephen Foster songs and other excerpts from Civil War martial airs. Its opening, only a few months after WWII began in Europe, helped American audiences to identify with the war story and its theme of survival. With three years advance publicity and Hollywood myth-making, three and one-half hours running time (with one intermission), a gala premiere in Atlanta on December 15, 1939, highest-grossing film status (eventually reaching $200 million), and Max Steiner's sweeping musical score, the exquisitely-photographed, Technicolor film was a blockbuster in its own time. A budgeted investment of over $4 million in production costs was required - an enormous, record-breaking sum. The film (originally rough-cut at 6 hours in length) was challenging in its making, due to its controversial subject matter including rape, drunkenness, moral dissipation and adultery and its epic qualities, with more than 50 speaking roles and 2,400 extras. Rhett Butler's infamous farewell line to Scarlett O'Hara, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn", was voted in a poll by the American Film Institute in 2005 as the most memorable line in cinema history. In 2005, the AFI ranked Max Steiner's score for the film the second greatest of all time. The AFI also ranked the film #2 in their list of the greatest romances of all time (100 Years... 100 Passions).

Isabella Bogdain

 
  

 

   

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